Highlights in this issue

Authors


Human breast milk may not contain sufficient proteins and minerals for preterm infants. Nathalie Charpak et al in Bogota, Colombia report that hind milk better meets preterms' nutritional needs (Pages 1755–1759).

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Cannabis was found in the meconium of 5% of newborns in Barcelona, Spain, although only 1.7% admitted gestational drug use, which is reported by Jaime Lozano et al (Pages 1734–1737).

Irene Elgen et al from Bergen, Norway report that children exposed to drugs are somatically healthy and seem to have a normal cognitive development in contrast to children who have been exposed to alcohol during fetal life. However, there was an increased risk of developing ADHD after maternal drug abuse (Pages 1730–1733).

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If you happen to have drawn the wrong genes, you may be subject not only to being a long-distance runner but also to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Fitness seems to attenuate the risk of developing metabolic syndrome among fat children and adolescents according to Joey C Eisenmann (Pages 1723–1729). (See also article by Dirk Vissers et al. this issue, pages 1809–1813). It is encouraging that physical activity has increased among school children in Sweden. (See also article by Anders Raustorp and Johnny Ludvigsson, pages 1824–1828).

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The discovery of hundreds of thousands of children in Romanian orphanages caused an outcry a few years ago. As many as 600 000 children reside in Russian orphanages and the number increases annually. Up to 25 000 of these children have been adopted into North America and Europe. Laurie C Miller et al report about the health status of these children in Murmansk. Many were born after prenatal exposure to drugs and alcohol. A notable proportion of these children were underweight and microcephalic. The orphanages studied in Murmansk were found to provide some beneficial temporary care for children whose parents were unable to care for them (Pages 1765–1769).

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Ancillary