Inconsistent determination of overweight by two anthropometric indices in girls with Turner syndrome

Authors

  • Tsuyoshi Isojima,

    1. Clinical Research Center, National Center for Child Health and Development, Ohkura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Susumu Yokoya,

    1. Clinical Research Center, National Center for Child Health and Development, Ohkura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Japan
    2. The Foundation for Growth Science, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Junko Ito,

    1. Toranomon Hospital, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
    2. The Foundation for Growth Science, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Reiko Horikawa,

    1. Clinical Research Center, National Center for Child Health and Development, Ohkura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Japan
    2. The Foundation for Growth Science, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Toshiaki Tanaka

    1. The Foundation for Growth Science, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan
    2. Tanaka Growth Clinic, Taishidoh, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, Japan
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Correspondence
Tsuyoshi Isojima, Clinical Research Center, National Center for Child Health and Development, 2-10-1 Ohkura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 157-8535, Japan. Tel: +81-3-3416-0181 | Fax: +81-3-3416-2222 | Email: isojima-t@ncchd.go.jp

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of overweight in girls with Turner syndrome (TS) as classified by the two major anthropometric indices, body mass index (BMI) and weight-for-height (WFH) and to make growth reference charts of them for comparison with those of the normal population.

Method: The samples for analysis were obtained from a retrospective cohort. In total, 1447 girls' cross-sectional data were analysed. Subjects were divided into four groups by ages: group A (0–5.99 years), B (6–10.99 years), C (11–15.99 years) and D (16–20.99 years). The cut-off values of overweight by BMI and WFH were those of the 90th percentile and 120 percent, respectively and the prevalence was calculated. For constructing growth reference charts, the LMS method was used.

Results: The prevalence of overweight differed between the two indices. The proportions of the coincidental classification in all subjects, group A, B, C and D were 82.53%, 89.96%, 91.79%, 69.98% and 60.61%, respectively. These differences corresponded to the difference of age-dependent patterns of the two indices from those of the normal population, as judged from the growth charts constructed with all subjects.

Conclusion: A discrepancy in the prevalence of overweight as classified by BMI and WFH for girls with TS was detected.

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