Blood pressure support in extremely premature infants is affected by different courses of antenatal steroids

Authors

  • GV Nair,

    1. . Department of Pediatrics and Human Development, College Of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
    2. . Division of Neonatology, Sparrow Regional Children’s Center, Lansing, MI, USA
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  • SA Omar

    1. . Department of Pediatrics and Human Development, College Of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
    2. . Division of Neonatology, Sparrow Regional Children’s Center, Lansing, MI, USA
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SA Omar, M.D., Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Sparrow Hospital, 1215 East Michigan Avenue, Lansing, MI 48909-7980, USA. Tel: (517)-483-2670 | Fax: (517)-483-3994 |
Email: omar@msu.edu

Abstract

Objective:  To examine the effects of partial, single and multiple courses of antenatal corticosteroids (ANS) on the need for blood pressure support in extremely premature infants.

Methods:  Extremely premature infants with gestational age of 24 to 28 weeks were included in this study during a 5-year period. The main outcome measure of the study was the amount of blood pressure support during the first 3 days of life.

Results:  The study infants (n = 163) were divided into: infants not exposed (ANS; n = 27) and exposed to ANS (ANS; n = 136). Blood pressure support was significantly lower in ANS compared with No ANS (65% vs 96%; p = 0.003) and in single course (SANS; n = 73) and ≥2 courses (MANS; n = 34) compared with partial course of ANS (PANS; n = 29) (62%, 56% vs 86%; p = 0.03). The number of infants who received volume support and the amount of volume support were significantly lower in ANS compared with that in No ANS (p < 0.001) and in SANS and MANS compared with that in PANS (p < 0.02).

Conclusion:  Exposure to multiple courses of ANS was as beneficial as single course of ANS in decreasing the need for blood pressure support in extremely premature infants.

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