Aerobic fitness in prepubertal children according to level of body fat

Authors

  • Magnus Dencker,

    1. Department of Clinical Physiology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden
    2. Center for Research in Childhood Health, Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
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  • Anna Bugge,

    1. Center for Research in Childhood Health, Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
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  • Bianca Hermansen,

    1. Center for Research in Childhood Health, Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
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  • Karsten Froberg,

    1. Center for Research in Childhood Health, Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
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  • Lars B Andersen

    1. Center for Research in Childhood Health, Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
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Magnus Dencker, MD, PhD, Department of Clinical Physiology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden.
Tel: +46 40 338731 |
Fax: +46 40 338768 |
Email: magnus.dencker@skane.se

Abstract

Aim:  The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between maximum oxygen uptake (VO2PEAK) and body fat in young children on a population-based level.

Methods:  Participants were 586 children (311 boys and 275 girls) aged 6.8 ± 0.4 years, recruited from a population-based cohort. VO2PEAK was measured by indirect calorimetry during a maximal exercise test. Percent body fat (BF%) was estimated from skinfold measurements.

Results:  Significant relationships existed between BF% and absolute values of VO2PEAK (mL/min), VO2PEAK scaled by body weight (mL/min/kg) and VO2PEAK by allometric scaling (mL/min/kg0.71), whereas no relationships were detected for VO2PEAK scaled to fat-free mass (FFM) (mL/min/FFM). Person correlation coefficients for boys were 0.26, −0.38, −0.19 and −0.01 NS and for girls 0.33, −0.42, −0.21 and −0.03 NS, respectively. Significant differences in VO2PEAK existed between different quartiles of BF%, with the exception when VO2PEAK was scaled to FFM.

Conclusion:  Our findings document the coexistence of two known risk factors for disease at a young age on a population-base and confirms that VO2PEAK was scaled to FFM represents a body fat independent way of expressing fitness.

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