Respiratory disease and early serum S100A12 changes in very premature infants

Authors

  • Alison Loughran-Fowlds,

    1. .University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    2. .Leslie Stevens Newborn Research Laboratory, Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick, NSW, Australia
    3. .Grace Centre for Newborn Care, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, NSW, Australia
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  • Steven Leach,

    1. .University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
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  • Jianwei Lin,

    1. .Leslie Stevens Newborn Research Laboratory, Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick, NSW, Australia
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  • Julee Oei,

    1. .University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    2. .Department of Newborn Care, Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick, NSW, Australia
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  • Richard Henry,

    1. .University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
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  • Andrew S Day,

    1. .University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    2. .Department of Paediatrics, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand
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  • Kei Lui

    1. .University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    2. .Leslie Stevens Newborn Research Laboratory, Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick, NSW, Australia
    3. .Department of Newborn Care, Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick, NSW, Australia
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Kei Lui, Department of Newborn Care, Royal Hospital for Women, Barker St, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia. Tel: +61 2 93826190 | Fax: +61 2 9382 6191 | Email: k.lui@unsw.edu.au

Abstract

Aim:  The role of granulocyte-specific S100A12, a marker for inflammatory disorders, in newborn lung disease is unknown. We compared postnatal blood S100A12 concentrations against respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD).

Methods:  Blood samples from 92 newborns were collected on admission, 12 h, day 1, day 3–4 and day 7, and analysed for S100A12. IL-8 and IL-6 were assayed in 52 infants.

Results:  Infants with RDS were significantly more premature (median 27 vs. 34 weeks), more likely to receive antenatal corticosteroids (84% vs. 26%) and have lower neutrophil counts (median 2.4 vs. 3.8 × 109/L) at admission. S100A12 levels peaked during the first day and were significantly lower in preterm infants with RDS compared to those without (median 250 vs. 616 ng/mL at 12 h, 281 vs. 828 ng/mL day 1, respectively). S100A12 levels were low among the 35 very preterm infants (24–29 week gestation) regardless of the presence of BPD (285 vs. 288 ng/mL on day 1). In comparison, IL-8 and IL-6 levels were not different between groups.

Conclusion:  Plasma S100A12 is low in infants with RDS, possibly because of gestationally related differences in neutrophil response or to the effects of antenatal corticosteroids. It is therefore not a useful marker of BPD development.

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