• Open Access

Low postnatal serum IGF-I levels are associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)

Authors

  • Chatarina Löfqvist,

    1. .Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
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  • Gunnel Hellgren,

    1. .Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
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  • Aimon Niklasson,

    1. .Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
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  • Eva Engström,

    1. .Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
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  • David Ley,

    1. .Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden
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  • Ingrid Hansen-Pupp,

    1. .Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden
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  • and the WINROP Consortium

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    • WINROP Consortium (in alphabetical order): Ann Hellström, MD, PhD1, Anna-Lena Hård MD1, PhD, Chatarina Löfqvist, PhD1, Lois E H Smith, MD, PhD, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, USA.


Chatarina Löfqvist, PhD, Section of Pediatric Ophthalmology, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, S-416 85 Gothenburg, Sweden. Tel: +46-31-768672719 | Fax: +46-31-848952 |
Email: chatarina.lofqvist@gu.se

Abstract

Aim:  To characterize postnatal changes in serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) in relation to development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in very preterm infants.

Methods:  Longitudinal study of 108 infants with mean (SD) gestational age (GA) 27.2 (2.2) weeks. Weekly serum samples of IGF-I were analysed from birth until postmenstrual age (PMA) 36 weeks. Multivariate models were developed to identify independent predictors of BPD.

Results:  Postnatal mean IGF-I levels at postnatal day (PND) 3–21 were lower in infants with BPD compared with infants with no BPD (16 vs. 26 μg/L, p < 0.001). Longitudinal postnatal change in IGF-I levels (IGF-I regression coefficient (β)), PNDs 3–21, was lower in infants with BPD compared with infants with no BPD (0.28 vs. 0.97, p = 0.002) and mean IGF-I during PMA 30–33 weeks was lower in infants with BPD as compared with infants without BPD (22 vs. 29 μg/L, p < 0.001). In a binomial multiple regression model, lower GA, male gender and lower mean serum IGF-I levels during PND 3–21 were the most predictive risk factors associated with BPD (r2 = 0.634, p < 0.001).

Conclusion:  Lower IGF-I concentrations during the first weeks after very preterm birth are associated with later development of BPD.

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