Reduced pathogenicity of a Candida albicans MAP kinase phosphatase (CPP1) mutant in the murine mastitis model

Authors

  • FAISAL A. GUHAD,

    1. Division of Comparative Medicine, Department of Physiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
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  • CSILLA CSANK,

    1. Eukaryotic Genetics Group, National Research Council of Canada, Biotechnology Research Institute, Montreal
    2. Centre de Recherche, Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal and Department of Pharmacology, University of Montreal, Montreal
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  • HENRIK E. JENSEN,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Pathobiology, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • DAVID Y. THOMAS,

    1. Eukaryotic Genetics Group, National Research Council of Canada, Biotechnology Research Institute, Montreal
    2. Biology Department, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • MALCOLM WHITEWAY,

    1. Eukaryotic Genetics Group, National Research Council of Canada, Biotechnology Research Institute, Montreal
    2. Biology Department, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • JANN HAU

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Comparative Medicine, Department of Physiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
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Division of Comparative Medicine, Uppsala University, BMC, Box 570, S-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

Candida albicans strains with a deletion of the mitogen-activated protein kinase tyrosine phosphatase gene (CPP1) are derepressed in the yeast-to-hyphal transition on solid surfaces in vitro at ambient temperatures and this gene is therefore required for repression of the yeast-to-hyphal switch. The pathology caused by a CPP1 null mutant strain was compared with that of the null mutant into which the wild-type CPP1 gene was introduced by homologous recombination and with the wild-type parent strain in a murine mycotic mastitis model. The mammary glands of lactating mice (at day 5 postpartum) were infected for 2, 4 and 6 days with 1 times 105, 1 times 106 and 1 times 107 cell-forming units before euthanasia. Infected and non-infected control glands were evaluated histopathologically. The null mutant strains showed less severe pathology than the two control strains. The Cpp1p tyrosine phosphatase may thus be considered a virulence determinant during localized infection in C. albicans.

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