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The “Dome Phenomenon” Associated with Maxillary Sinus Augmentation

Authors

  • Dan Mahler DMD,

    1. Clinical instructor, Department of Periodontology, the Rambam Health Care Campus School of Graduate Dentistry;
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  • Liran Levin DMD,

    Corresponding author
    1. clinical instructor, Department of Oral Rehabilitation, The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel, and Department of Periodontology, the Rambam Health Care Campus School of Graduate Dentistry;
      Dr. Liran Levin, Department of Periodontology, the Rambam Health Care Campus School of Graduate Dentistry, Haifa, Israel; e-mail: liranl@post.tau.ac.il
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  • Hadar Zigdon DMD,

    1. clinical instructor, Department of Periodontology, the Rambam Health Care Campus School of Graduate Dentistry;
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  • Eli E. Machtei DMD

    1. Head of Rambam Health Care Campus School of Graduate Dentistry, chairman of the Department of Periodontology, and associate professor, Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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Dr. Liran Levin, Department of Periodontology, the Rambam Health Care Campus School of Graduate Dentistry, Haifa, Israel; e-mail: liranl@post.tau.ac.il

ABSTRACT

Aim: This case series is aimed to report a new phenomenon, the “dome phenomenon,” which was observed in infected augmented sinuses over several years.

Methods: Five patients are presented in whom sinus lift augmentation resulted in postoperative infection with inflammation and suppuration. The patients received aggressive anti-inflammatory treatment and surgical debridement of the inflamed tissue, including some grafted material performed through the lateral window of the primary procedure.

Results: The inflammatory condition was reversed, and the site healed clinically. Radiographically, a dome-shaped, radio-opaque tissue was observed at the superiormost aspect of the grafted sinus. This “dome phenomenon” was further confirmed during dental implant placement, which indicates healing potential adjacent to the maxillary sinus membrane.

Conclusions: The current report, as well as other studies and case series, suggests that there is great potential for healing and bone formation in the maxillary sinus membrane. The precise mechanism is not known. Further clinical and histologic studies are needed to understand the regenerative potential of the Schneiderian membrane.

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