Get access

Long-Term Results of Endosteal Implants Following Radical Oral Cancer Surgery with and without Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

Authors

  • Sabine S. Linsen Dr. med. dent.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Associate professor, Department of Prosthodontics, Preclinical Education and Dental Materials Science, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany;
      Dr. Sabine S. Linsen, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University of Bonn, Welschnonnenstr. 17, D-53111 Bonn, Germany; e-mail: sabinelinsen@web.de
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Markus Martini Dr. med., Dr. med. dent.,

    1. associate professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany;
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Helmut Stark Prof. Dr. med. dent.

    1. professor and head of department, Department of Prosthodontics, Preclinical Education and Dental Materials Science, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author

Dr. Sabine S. Linsen, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University of Bonn, Welschnonnenstr. 17, D-53111 Bonn, Germany; e-mail: sabinelinsen@web.de

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term survival of implants and implant-retained prostheses in patients after ablative surgery of oral cancer with or without adjunctive radiation therapy.

Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2008, 66 patients who had undergone ablative tumor surgery in the oral cavity were treated with dental implants (n = 262). Thirty-four patients received radiation therapy in daily fractions of 2 Gy administered on 18 to 30 days. Implants were inserted in the maxilla (49; 18.7%) or mandible (213; 81.3%), in non-irradiated residual (65; 24.8%) or grafted bone (44; 16.8%) and in irradiated residual (15.6%) or grafted bone (39; 14.9%). Seventeen fixed protheses and 53 removable dentures (34 bar attachments, 9 telescopic and 10 ball retained dentures) were inserted.

Results: Mean follow-up after implant insertion was 47.99 (±34.31) months (range 12–140 months). The overall 1-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates of all implants were 96.6%, 96.6%, and 86.9%, respectively. Fourteen implants were lost in nine patients (5.3% of all implants); eight implants were primary losses, and five secondary losses because of an operation of tumor recurrence. There was no significantly lower implant survival for implants inserted into irradiated bone (p = .302), bone and/or soft-tissue grafts (p = .436), and maxilla or mandible (p = .563). All prosthetic restorations in patients without tumor recurrence could be maintained during the observation period.

Conclusions: Implant survival is not significantly influenced by radiation therapy, grafts (bone and/or soft tissue), or location (maxilla or mandible). However, implants placed in irradiated bone exhibit a higher failure rate during the healing period than those placed in non-irradiated bone. No superstructure was particularly favorable. Osseointegrated implants can be used successfully in patients with prior history of ablative surgery with and without additional radiation therapy.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary