Fatal Israeli Spotted Fever in a UK Traveler to South Portugal

Authors

  • Joshua T.Y. Chai MB Bchir,

    1. Department of Medicine, Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Hinchingbrooke Health Care NHS Trust, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, UK
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  • Marina E. Eremeeva MD, PhD,

    1. Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch, National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-borne, and Enteric Diseases, Atlanta, GA, USA
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  • Colin D.R. Borland MD,

    1. Department of Medicine, Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Hinchingbrooke Health Care NHS Trust, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, UK
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  • J. Andreas Karas FCPath

    Corresponding author
    1. Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch, National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-borne, and Enteric Diseases, Atlanta, GA, USA
      J. Andreas Karas, FCPath, Departments of Microbiology, Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Hinchingbrooke Health Care NHS Trust, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE29 6NT, UK. E-mail: andreas.karas@hinchingbrooke.nhs.uk
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J. Andreas Karas, FCPath, Departments of Microbiology, Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Hinchingbrooke Health Care NHS Trust, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE29 6NT, UK. E-mail: andreas.karas@hinchingbrooke.nhs.uk

Abstract

A 63-year-old previously healthy woman developed a severe systemic infection 5 days after returning from a holiday to Southern Portugal. She subsequently died, and polymerase chain reaction of a blood sample was positive for Rickettsia conorii ssp israeliensis. The prevalence of severe forms of this illness in the Mediterranean Basin is discussed.

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