Using Multiple Sampling Approaches to Measure Sexual Risk-taking Among Young People in Haiti: Programmatic Implications

Authors

  • Ilene S. Speizer,

    1. Research Associate Professor, Department of Maternal and Child Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, 206 W. Franklin Street, CB 8120, Chapel Hill, NC 27516. E-mail: speizer@email.unc.edu.
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  • Harry Beauvais,

    1. Director of Monitoring, Evaluation, and Research, Fondation pour la Santé Reproductrice et l'Education Familiale (FOSREF), Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
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  • Anu Manchikanti Gómez,

    1. Doctoral candidate, Department of Maternal and Child Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, 206 W. Franklin Street, CB 8120, Chapel Hill, NC 27516.
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  • Theresa Finn Outlaw,

    1. At the time this research was conducted, Theresa Finn Outlaw was Research Associate at the MEASURE Evaluation project, Carolina Population Center, Chapel Hill, NC
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  • Barbara Roussel

    1. Technical Researcher at FOSREF.
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Abstract

No previous published research has examined the applicability of varying methods for identifying young people who are at high risk of experiencing unintended pregnancy and acquiring HIV infection. This study compares three surveys of young people aged 15–24 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in terms of their sociodemographic characteristics and sexual behaviors and the surveys' usefulness for identifying young people at high risk and for program planning. The surveys consist of responses from: a representative sample of young people in the 2005–06 Haiti Demographic and Health Survey (HDHS), a 2004 facility-based study, and a 2006–07 venue-based study that used the Priorities for Local AIDS Control Efforts (PLACE) method. The facility-based and PLACE studies included larger proportions of single, sexually experienced young people and people who knew someone with HIV/AIDS than did the HDHS. More respondents in the PLACE sample had multiple sex partners in the past year and received money or gifts in return for sex, compared with respondents in the facility study. At first and last sex, more PLACE respondents used contraceptives, including condoms. Experience of pregnancy was most commonly reported in the data from the facility-based sample; however, more ever-pregnant PLACE respondents than others reported ever having terminated a pregnancy. Program managers seeking to implement prevention activities should consider using facility- or venue-based methods to identify and understand the behaviors of young people at high risk.

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