MEDIATION AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Current Policies and Practices

Authors

  • Nancy Thoennes,

    1. Nancy Thoennes, Ph.D., is Associate Director at the Center for Policy Research in Denver; Colorado. She has published widely in the fietield.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Peter Salem,

    1. Peter Salem is Associate Director of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts and a project director
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jessica Pearson

    1. Jessica Pearson, Ph.D., is Director at the Center for Policy Research in Dever, Colorado. She has been the principal researcher on a number of federally and privately funded research projects in the area of family law.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Authors' Notes: Survey design and administration were made possible by a grant to the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts from the State Justice Institute. Data analysis was conducted under a grant to the Center for Policy Research from the National Institute of Justice (93-IJ-CX-0036). We would like to thank Barbara Hart, Esq., and Barbara Landau, Ph.D., for their comments on an earlier draft of this paper. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the funding agencies or project consultants.

Abstract

This article summarizes policies and procedures used by various courts in the United States in responding to domestic violence. Over 200 courts and services were contacted under a grant from the State Justice Institute in developing this survey. The article covers the profile of mediation services, mediator training regarding domestic violence, screening for domestic violence and protocols used.

Ancillary