RADIOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT IN THE DOG

Authors

  • Linda J. Konde D.V.M.,

    1. Ohio State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Columbus, Ohio 43210, where Dr. Konde was a Resident in Radiology, Dr. Omstead is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery, and Dr. Hohn is a Professor in the Department of Surgery
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    • Colorado State University, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, 300 W. Drake, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523

  • Marvin L. Olmstead D.V.M., M.S.,

    1. Ohio State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Columbus, Ohio 43210, where Dr. Konde was a Resident in Radiology, Dr. Omstead is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery, and Dr. Hohn is a Professor in the Department of Surgery
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  • R. Bruce Hohn D.V.M., M.S.

    1. Ohio State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Columbus, Ohio 43210, where Dr. Konde was a Resident in Radiology, Dr. Omstead is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery, and Dr. Hohn is a Professor in the Department of Surgery
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Abstract

The radiographic signs associated with implanted canine total hip prostheses include: (1) a 1 mm-or-less wide static lucent zone at the acetabular and femoral bone-cement interfaces, and (2) periosteal bone proliferation surrounding the stem of the femoral prosthesis. The radiographic signs associated with total hip replacement complications are dislocation of the femoral component, bone changes suggestive of infection involving the acetabular and femoral components, and loosening of the acetabular component. Arthrography is beneficial in determining the presence of a loose prosthesis with or without infection.

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