MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE EQUINE METACARPOPHALANGEAL JOINT: THREE-DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTION AND ANATOMIC ANALYSIS

Authors

  • Mark J. Martinelli DVM, MS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 1008 West Hazelwood, Urbana, IL 610801
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  • Igor V. Kuriashkin PhD,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 1008 West Hazelwood, Urbana, IL 610801
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  • Bridget O. Carragher PhD,

    1. Visualization Laboratory, Beckman Institute for Advanced science and Technology, University of Illinois.
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  • Robert B. Clarkson PhD,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 1008 West Hazelwood, Urbana, IL 610801
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  • Gordon J. Baker BVSc, PhD, MRCVS

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, 1008 West Hazelwood, Urbana, IL 610801
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  • This report represents a portion of a thesis submitted by the senior author to the graduate school as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the MS degree.

  • Dr. Martinelli's current address is The Weipers Centre for Equine Welfare, Division of Equine Clinical Studies, University of Glasgow Veterinary School, Bearsden Road, Bearsden, Glasgow, scotland G61 1QH.

  • Supported by the Maria Caleel Fund for Equine Sports Medicine Research.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Martinelli

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine the equine metacarpophalangeal joint. Thirty-two saggital images generated by partial volume imaging were transferred to a computer for three dimensional reconstruction and analysis. All the tissues constituting the metacarpophalangeal joint were readily identified. The most significant increase finding regarded the soft tissues on the palmar aspect of the metacarpophalangeal joint and their interactions with the proximal sesamoid bones. the equine metacarpophalangeal joint has not previously been evaluated using 3-dimensional imaging software.

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