CORRELATION BETWEEN THORACIC RADIOGRAPHIC CHANGES AND REMISSION/SURVIVAL DURATION IN 270 DOGS WITH LYMPHOSARCOMA

Authors

  • Gregory S. Starrak DVM,

    1. Department of Anatomy, Physiological Sciences and Radiol-ogy, College of Veterinary Medicine, 4700 Hillsborough St., Raleigh, NC, 27606
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  • Clifford R. Berry DVM,

    1. Department of Anatomy, Physiological Sciences and Radiol-ogy, College of Veterinary Medicine, 4700 Hillsborough St., Raleigh, NC, 27606
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  • Rodney L. Page DVM, MS,

    1. Department of Companion Animal and Special Species, North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, 4700 Hillsborough St., Raleigh, NC, 27606
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  • Jeffrey L. Johnson MS,

    1. Department of Biostatistics, Computing and Data Management. Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 27710.
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  • Donald E. Thrall DVM, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Anatomy, Physiological Sciences and Radiol-ogy, College of Veterinary Medicine, 4700 Hillsborough St., Raleigh, NC, 27606
      Address correspondence and reprint requests of Dr. Thrall
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Address correspondence and reprint requests of Dr. Thrall

Abstract

A retrospective study was undertaken wherein the medical records and thoracic radiographs of 270 dogs with lymphosarcoma were reviewed to determine the type and frequency of thoracic radiographic changes. Statistical evaluation of the relationship between radiographic, clinical and immunologic factors and the primary remission duration and survival times was performed using univariate and multivariate analysis. One hundred ninety-two dogs (71 %) had some type of thoracic radiographicabnormality, including 80 dogs (29.6%) with pulmonary infiltrates and 164 dogs (64.4%) with thoracic lymphadenomegaly. Only T-cell phenotype (p = 0.0056 for survival, p = 0.0045 for remission) and the presence of cranial mediastinal lymphadenomegaly (p = 0.0005 for survival, p = 0.0129 for remission) were identified as having a significant negative correlation to both primary remission and survival duration by multivariate analysis.

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