LOW-FIELD MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF A PYOCEPHALUS AND A SUSPECTED BRAIN ABSCESS IN A GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG

Authors

  • Gabriela Seiler Dr. Med. Vet.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Section of Radiology, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, University of Berne, Tiefenau Hospital, Berne, Switzerland.
      Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. G. Seiler, Klinik fur kleine Haustiere, Liinggassstr. 128. CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
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  • Sigitas Cizinauskas Dr. Med. Vet.,

    1. Section of Neurology, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, University of Berne, Tiefenau Hospital, Berne, Switzerland.
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  • Jürg Scheidegger Dr. Med. FMH,

    1. Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Tiefenau Hospital, Berne, Switzerland.
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  • Johann Lang Dr. Med. Vet.

    1. Section of Radiology, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, University of Berne, Tiefenau Hospital, Berne, Switzerland.
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Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. G. Seiler, Klinik fur kleine Haustiere, Liinggassstr. 128. CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on an eight-year-old, neutered female German Shepherd dog with a history of acute depression, inappetence, and hyperthermia. A lesion in the cerebrum was suspected. Possible differential diagnoses were meningoencephalitis, neoplasia, and vascular lesion (infarction, bleeding). A ring enhancing lesion was found in the basal ganglia on the left side with edema of the surrounding brain tissue. A similar mass lesion was present in the right pterygoid musculature. With inversion recovery sequences an altered composition of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the left lateral ventricle could be detected. CSF analysis confirmed a pyocephalus, probably due to rupture of a brain abscess into the left lateral ventricle.

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