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COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF LUNG LOBE TORSION

Authors

  • GABRIELA SEILER,

    1. Department of Clinical Studies—Philadelphia, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010,
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  • TOBIAS SCHWARZ,

    1. Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin—Madison 2015 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706 -1100, and
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  • MASSIMO VIGNOLI,

    1. Clinica Veterinaria dell'Orologio, Via Gramsci 1/4, 40037 Sasso Marconi, Italy
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  • DANIEL RODRIGUEZ

    1. Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin—Madison 2015 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706 -1100, and
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Address correspondence and reprint requests to Gabriela Seiler, at the above address. E-mail: gseiler@vet.upenn.edu

Abstract

The imaging features of lung lobe torsion in 10 dogs (nine complete, one partial torsion) acquired with a helical single-slice computed tomography (CT) unit are described. Attenuation values of normal, rotated, and adjacent collapsed lung lobes before and after intravenous contrast medium administration were compared. Affected lung lobes were: left cranial (5), right middle (3), right cranial (1), and left caudal (1). CT findings in nine dogs with complete lung lobe torsion included pleural effusion and an abruptly ending bronchus. In eight of these dogs, enlargement, consolidation, emphysema of the affected lung lobe, and mediastinal shift to the contralateral side were present. Rotated lung lobes did not enhance, whereas adjacent collapsed and aerated lung lobes did (P<0.05). Apnea induced with hyperventilation or breath-hold is essential to reduce motion artefacts and obtain a diagnostic study.

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