ERRATUM


In a recent article by Fischetti and Kovak (Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2008;49:573-576), Figures 2 and 4 were incomplete. The correct figures are reproduced below.

  • image(2)

[ Ventral (A), dorsal (B), and right lateral (C) 3-D reformatted CT images of Dog 1. The line traversing the image in C denotes the localizer for the transverse CT image at the level of the porta hepatis. Note the large, tortuous azygous vein (*) extending through the aortic hiatus, arching lateral to the right kidney, and branching in a similar fashion as the aorta (arrowhead). The normal portal vein (P) does not communicate with the distended azygous vein or the posthepatic caudal vena cava. The prehepatic caudal vena cava is not present. This is best seen on the transverse image. The posthepatic caudal vena cava is formed by the confluence of hepatic veins cranial to the liver (arrow).]

  • image(4)

[ Ventral (A), dorsal (B), and left lateral (C) 3-D reformatted CT images of Dog 2. The line traversing the image in C denotes the localizer for the transverse CT image at the level of the porta hepatis. Note the large, tortuous azygous vein (*) that is mostly parallel with the aorta (arrowhead) and is arching lateral to the right kidney. On the left lateral 3-D reformatted CT image (C), a large branch (S) of the portal vein (P) is sigmoidal in shape, arching dorsal to the liver to enter the post-hepatic caudal vena cava (X).]

In addition, two references were incomplete. The full references are reproduced below.
13. Hamoud S, Nitecky S, Engel A, et al. Casual recognition of an azygous continuation of the inferior vena cava in a patient with lung cancer. Respiration 1999;66:66–68.

14. Martinez Garcia MA, Pastor A, Ferrando D. et al. Hypoplasia of the inferior vena cava with azygous continuation presenting as recurrent deep vein thrombosis. Am J Med Sci 2000;319:414–16.

We apologize for these errors.

Ancillary