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MULTISCALE IMAGE PROCESSING AND ANTISCATTER GRIDS IN DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY

Authors

  • WINNIE Y. LO,

    1. Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, Eklin Medical Systems Inc., 1605 Wyatt Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054
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  • WILLIAM J. HORNOF,

    1. School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, Eklin Medical Systems Inc., 1605 Wyatt Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054, and
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  • ALLISON L. ZWINGENBERGER,

    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, Eklin Medical Systems Inc., 1605 Wyatt Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054,
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  • IAN D. ROBERTSON

    1. Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27606
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  • Presented at the Annual Scientific Conference of ACVR in San Antonio, TX, October 21–25, 2008.

  • This investigation was funded by an ACVR Resident Research Grant. This investigation was also supported by the University of California, Davis, Center for Imaging Sciences.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Winnie Y. Lo, at the above address. E-mail: wylo@ucdavis.edu

Abstract

Scatter radiation is a source of noise and results in decreased signal-to-noise ratio and thus decreased image quality in digital radiography. We determined subjectively whether a digitally processed image made without a grid would be of similar quality to an image made with a grid but without image processing. Additionally the effects of exposure dose and of a using a grid with digital radiography on overall image quality were studied. Thoracic and abdominal radiographs of five dogs of various sizes were made. Four acquisition techniques were included (1) with a grid, standard exposure dose, digital image processing; (2) without a grid, standard exposure dose, digital image processing; (3) without a grid, half the exposure dose, digital image processing; and (4) with a grid, standard exposure dose, no digital image processing (to mimic a film-screen radiograph). Full-size radiographs as well as magnified images of specific anatomic regions were generated. Nine reviewers rated the overall image quality subjectively using a five-point scale. All digitally processed radiographs had higher overall scores than nondigitally processed radiographs regardless of patient size, exposure dose, or use of a grid. The images made at half the exposure dose had a slightly lower quality than those made at full dose, but this was only statistically significant in magnified images. Using a grid with digital image processing led to a slight but statistically significant increase in overall quality when compared with digitally processed images made without a grid but whether this increase in quality is clinically significant is unknown.

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