DISPLAY QUALITY OF DIFFERENT MONITORS IN FELINE DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY

Authors


Address correspondence and reprint requests to Eberhard Ludewig, at the above address. E-mail: ludewig@vetmed.uni-leipzig.de

Abstract

In human medical imaging, the performance of the monitor used for image reporting has a substantial impact on the diagnostic performance of the entire digital system. Our purpose was to compare the display quality of different monitors used in veterinary practice. Two medical-grade gray scale monitors (one cathode-ray tube [CRT], one liquid crystal display [LCD]) and two standard consumer-grade color monitors (one CRT, one LCD) were compared in the ability to display anatomic structures in cats. Radiographs of the stifle joint and the thorax of 30 normal domestic shorthair cats were acquired by use of a storage phosphor system. Two anatomic features of the stifle joint and five anatomic structures of the thorax were evaluated. The two medical-grade monitors had superior display quality compared with standard PC monitors. No differences were seen between the monochrome monitors. In comparison with the color CRT, the ratings of the color LCD were significantly worse. The ranking order was uniform for both the region and the criteria investigated. Differences in monitor luminance, bit depth, and screen size were presumed to be the reasons for the observed varying performance. The observed differences between monitors place an emphasis on the need for guidelines defining minimum requirements for the acceptance of monitors and for quality control in veterinary radiography.

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