AGREEMENT BETWEEN T2 AND HASTE SEQUENCES IN THE EVALUATION OF THORACOLUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC DISEASE IN DOGS

Authors

  • Joseph M. Mankin,

    Corresponding authorCurrent affiliation:
    1. Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
    • University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Knoxville, TN
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  • Silke Hecht,

    1. University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Knoxville, TN
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  • William B. Thomas

    1. University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Knoxville, TN
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  • Presented as a poster with abstract at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the ACVR, Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 11–15, 2011.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Joseph M. Mankin, Texas A&M University, 4474 TAMU, College Station, TX 77845. E-mail: jmankin@utk.edu

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare half-Fourier-acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) and T2-weighted (T2-W) sequences in dogs with thoracolumbar disc extrusion. MRI studies in 60 dogs (767 individual intervertebral disc spaces) were evaluated. Agreement between T2-W and HASTE sequences was assessed for two criteria: presence of an extradural lesion and treatment recommendation. There was moderate agreement between T2-W and HASTE sequences as to presence of an extradural lesion (κ = 0.575). HASTE was in agreement in 96.1% of the sites where no extradural lesion was identified on T2-W images, but only in 58.1% of the sites where extradural lesions were identified on T2-W images. There was also moderate agreement between T2-W and HASTE sequences as to treatment recommendations (κ = 0.476). HASTE was in agreement in 98.4% of the sites where a lesion was considered nonsurgical on T2 but only 82.1% of sites a lesion was considered surgical on T2. In 1.0% of sites considered not surgical and in 9.8% of sites considered equivocal based on T2-W images, a surgical lesion was identified on HASTE. Acquisition of a HASTE sequence in addition to conventional sequences may be beneficial in determining the severity of spinal cord compression in some cases when evaluating the canine spine.

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