IMAGING DIAGNOSIS—ACQUIRED PECTUS EXCAVATUM SECONDARY TO LARYNGEAL PARALYSIS IN A DOG

Authors

  • Tsumugi Anne Kurosawa,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN
    2. School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA
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  • Jeffrey D. Ruth,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN
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  • Jeffrey Steurer,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN
    2. Southwest Veterinary Surgical Services, Glendale, AZ
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  • Brenda Austin,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN
    2. Dogs and Cats Veterinary Referral, Bowie, MD
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  • Hock Gan Heng

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN
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Address correspondence and reprint requests to Jeffrey D Ruth, at the above address. E-mail: ruth0@purdue.edu

Abstract

A 13-year-old neutered female Labrador retriever had inspiratory dyspnea secondary to bilateral laryngeal paralysis. Radiographically, there was pectus excavatum with a mediastinal shift to the right. Arytenoid lateralization was performed, relieving the upper respiratory obstruction, and the sternal deformity also resolved. Chronic upper respiratory obstruction should be considered in dogs with pectus excavatum. Furthermore, correction of upper respiratory obstruction has the potential to result in resolution of pectus excavatum.

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