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Abstract

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  2. Abstract
  3. References

Trees absorb carbon. Planting more trees will absorb more carbon from the atmosphere, and soak up the man-made emissions that are causing climate change. It is a simple, easy and attractive solution that would allow us to continue our high-emission business as usual and still stave off global warming. Brendan Mackey examines whether or not it would work.

 

References

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. References
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