Oral mucosal lesions in denture wearers

Authors


Dr. Aree Jainkittivong, Department of Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University, Henri-Dunant Road, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
Tel: (662) 218-8942
Fax: (662) 218-8941
E-mail: jainaree@yahoo.com

Abstract

doi:10.1111/j.1741-2358.2009.00289.x
Oral mucosal lesions in denture wearers

Objective:  To determine the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (OMLs) and denture-related mucosal lesions (DMLs) in denture wearers and to co-relate the prevalence with age, gender, type of denture and any systemic conditions.

Materials and methods:  Dental records of 380 denture wearers were retrospectively reviewed for OMLs and DMLs.

Results:  We found 45% of the denture wearers had DMLs and 60.8% had OMLs not related to denture wearing. Although the prevalence of DMLs was higher in complete denture wearers than in partial denture wearers (49% vs. 42.2%), this difference was not significant. The most common DMLs were traumatic ulcer (19.5%) and denture-induced stomatitis (18.1%). When analysed by type, traumatic ulcer, denture hyperplasia, frictional keratosis and candidiasis were more common in complete denture wearers, whereas denture-induced stomatitis was more common in partial denture wearers. Frictional keratosis was more common in men than in women. The prevalence of OMLs not related to denture wearing was higher in complete denture wearers than in partial denture wearers, and the most common OML was fissured tongue (27.6%). No association between DMLs and systemic conditions or xerostomic drugs was noted.

Conclusion:  No differences in the prevalence of DMLs in association with denture type were found. The prevalence of OMLs not related to denture wearing was higher in complete denture wearers than in partial denture wearers. This difference was affected by age, and the data were similar to the findings observed in the elderly.

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