The Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort: design, population and dental health

Authors

  • Karen M. Heegaard,

    1. Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, School of Dentistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • Poul Holm-Pedersen,

    1. Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, School of Dentistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • Allan Bardow,

    1. Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • Ulla A. Hvidtfeldt,

    1. Centre for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • Morten Grønbæk,

    1. Centre for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • Kirsten Avlund

    1. Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    2. Danish Aging Research Centre, Universities of Aarhus, Southern Denmark and Copenhagen, Denmark
    3. Centre for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
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Poul Holm-Pedersen, Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Center, School of Dentistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 20, Noerre Allé, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark.
Tel.: +45-3532 6600
Fax: +45-3532 6505
E-mail: holmp@sund.ku.dk

Abstract

Gerodontology 2010; doi: 10.1111/j.1741-2358.2010.00383.x

The Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort: design, population and dental health

Background:  In order to study the way old age influence oral health, the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort (COHS) has been established.

Objectives:  To describe the design, measurement procedures, and baseline values for COHS including spatial distribution of restorations and dental caries as well as reasons for non-participation.

Materials and methods:  Seven hundred and eighty-three individuals aged 65 years or older, from a total of 1918 invited elderly people, underwent an interview regarding oral health-related behaviour and a clinical oral examination including measurement of unstimulated whole saliva flow rate.

Results:  Twelve percent of the COHS was edentulous. The number of dental restorations was higher for women compared to men; however, men had more caries than women. Coronal caries was most frequent on mesial and distal surfaces and on the maxillary incisors and canines; root caries was most frequent on labial surfaces and evenly distributed within the dentition. Only 41% of all invited elderly people accepted the invitation, with old age and poor health being the primary reasons for non-participation.

Conclusion:  The baseline values for COHS show that a substantial proportion of the participants had retained a natural dentition and that dental caries was prevalent with the anterior maxillary teeth being most affected.

Ancillary