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Keywords:

  • denture-cleaning method;
  • denture brush;
  • denture cleanser;
  • microorganism

doi: 10.1111/j.1741-2358.2011.00461.x

Examination of denture-cleaning methods based on the quantity of microorganisms adhering to a denture

Objectives:  To investigate effective denture-cleaning methods, we examined the relationships between the quantity of microorganisms adhering to dentures and the use of a denture brush and the frequency of use of a denture cleanser.

Subjects and Methods:  Denture plaque was collected from the mucosal surface of the examined dentures, which were 142 and 80 upper and lower complete dentures, respectively, worn by 96 outpatients (mean age: 71.9 years) of a university hospital and 41 nursing home residents (mean age: 84.8 years). The collected microorganisms were counted in terms of isolated representative colonies that were cultured and identified using standard methods. The use of a denture brush, the frequency of use, and the type and soaking time of denture cleansers as denture-cleaning methods were surveyed.

Results:  The quantity of microorganisms was significantly lower in dentures of denture brush users than in those of non-users in the outpatients (p < 0.01, Mann–Whitney U test). The quantity of microorganisms was significantly lower in the dentures of outpatients who used a denture cleanser daily or 3–4 times a week than in those who used one once or less per month and in the dentures of nursing home residents who used one daily than in those who used one at other frequencies (p < 0.05, Kruskal–Wallis test, followed by Dunn’s Multiple Comparison test).

Conclusion:  Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that the use of a denture brush and daily use of denture cleanser should be recommended to complete dentures wearers as denture-cleaning methods that effectively reduce the quantity of microorganisms adhering to dentures.