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Correlates of Coparenting During Infancy*

Authors


  • *

    Data from this study are based on the doctoral dissertation of Yvonne Caldera. The authors would like to thank Cullen Maney, Cody Dickson, Marion O’Brien, Jay Atwater, Kim Murphy, Pat Robinson, Michelle Knoll, Aynsley Anderson, and Kathy Zima for their help in various phases of data collection and coding. We are grateful to the children, parents, and teachers of the Kansas University Infant Study Center for their time and participation.

**Eric W. Lindsey is Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies, P.O. Box 41162, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1162 (ericlindsey@ttu.edu). Yvonne Caldera is Associate Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at the Texas Tech University. Malinda Colwell is Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at the Texas Tech University.

Abstract

Abstract: This study examined family characteristics associated with the coparenting behavior of 60 parents with an 11- to 15-month-old infant (30 boys, 30 girls) during a structured triadic play session. Mothers reported on family demographics, social support, and child temperament. Both parents reported on their self-esteem and childrearing beliefs. Fathers displayed more supportive coparenting behavior than mothers. Mothers’ intrusive coparenting behavior differed based on the number of children, parent's employment status, and child gender. Social support, parental self-esteem, and child temperament were significant correlates of individual coparenting behavior. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for family theory and family practice.

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