Racial and Ethnic Similarities and Differences in Beliefs About Intergenerational Assistance to Older Adults After Divorce and Remarriage*

Authors


  • *

    This study was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Aging (AG17967).

**Marilyn Coleman is a Curators’ Professor of Human Development and Family Studies at University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211(colemanma@missouri.edu).

Lawrence H. Ganong is Professor of Human Development at the School of Nursing at University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (ganongl@missouri.edu).

Tanja C. Rothrauff is a Graduate Research Assistant in Human Development and Family Studies at University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (tcrp6d@mizzou.edu).

Abstract

Abstract: We examined beliefs about intergenerational responsibilities to assist older kin with a national sample of 362 Latinos, 492 African Americans, 121 Asian Americans, and 2,122 White European Americans using multiple-segment factorial vignettes. More similarities than differences existed between ethnic groups, but Asian Americans and African Americans endorsed norms that younger adults should assist older kin more often than White European Americans. Latinos did not differ from European Americans in beliefs about intergenerational assistance. All groups believed that parents should be helped more than stepparents.

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