Intimate Partner Violence of Rural Aging Women*

Authors


  • *

    Support for this study was provided by the University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the Annual Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America, Washington, DC, 2004.

**Pamela B. Teaster, Associate Professor, 306 Wethington Health Sciences Building, 900 S Limestone, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (pteaster@uky.edu). Karen A. Roberto, Professor and Director, Center for Gerontology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (kroberto@vt.edu).Tyler A. Dugar, ABD, 306 Wethington Health Sciences Building, 900 S Limestone, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (tdugar@uky.edu).

Abstract

Abstract: Although reports of intimate partner violence (IPV) decrease with age, a significant number of aging women experience IPV in their relationships. The structure and culture of rural environments may inadvertently conceal violence against aging women and inhibit prevention and treatment efforts. Guided by an ecological community framework, 3 focus groups involving 24 professionals working with victims of IPV in rural Kentucky and in-depth interviews with 10 aging rural women who had experienced IPV were conducted to examine the trajectory of, and community responses to, violence in late life. Findings revealed multiple interacting influences on IPV of aging women in rural areas including the women’s families and resources, culture and locality, religion, community support, and government entities.

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