Mothers’ Racial, Ethnic, and Cultural Socialization of Transracially Adopted Asian Children*

Authors


  • *

    The Northeast-Northwest Collaborative Adoption Project was supported by a grant from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, the Kathryn Rudolph Memorial Research Fund of the University of Oregon, and National Science Foundation grants (BCS-9907860, BCS-9907811, and BCS-0196511). The authors wish to thank Wayne Osgood for his advice on statistical analyses.

**Kristen E. Johnston is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at The Pennsylvania State University, 211 Henderson Building South, University Park, PA 16802-6504 (Kristen_E_Johnston@hotmail.com).

Janet K. Swim is Professor in the Department of Psychology at The Pennsylvania State University, 515 Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802 (jks4@psu.edu).

Brian M. Saltsman is an instructor in the Department of Biobehavioral Health at The Pennsylvania State University, 315 East Health and Human Development, University Park, PA 16802 (bishop1977@hotmail.com).

Kirby Deater-Deckard is Professor in the Department of Psychology at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 109 Williams Hall (0436), Blacksburg, VA 24061 (kirbydd@vt.edu).

Steven A. Petrill is Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Science at The Ohio State University, 135 Campbell Hall, 1787 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (spetrill@ehe.osu.edu).

Abstract

Abstract: This study examined maternal and child predictors of White mothers’ cultural socialization/pluralism and preparation for bias of Chinese and Korean adopted children in families participating in the Northeast-Northwest Collaborative Adoption Project. Mother’s psychological connection to Asian Americans, but not White identity, and children’s age predicted cultural socialization/pluralism and preparation for bias. Birth country was related to cultural socialization/pluralism but not preparation for bias. Cultural socialization/pluralism was related to fewer externalizing problems but not to internalizing problems. Preparation for bias was not related to behavioral problems. The implications of these findings are summarized in terms of interventions aimed at increasing mothers’ connections to Asian American communities or individuals, providing Korean cultural information to parents of Korean adoptees, and the timing of interventions.

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