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Long-Term Effects of Stressors on Relationship Well-Being and Parenting Among Rural African American Women*

Authors


  • *

    This research was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health through funding for the Center for Family Research in Rural Mental Health (MH48165) at Iowa State University. Additional funding was provided by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station (Project 3320).

**Velma M. Murry is at the Institute for Behavioral Research, Center for Family Research, University of Georgia, 1095 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30602-4527 (vmurry@uga.edu). Amanda Harrell is at the 3-C Institute for Social Development, 1903 N. Harrison Ave., Suite 101, Cary, NC 27513 (ssgrina@3cisd.com). Gene H. Brody is Director and Regents Professor, Center for Family Research, University of Georgia, 1095 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30602 (gbrody@uga.edu). Yi-Fu Chen is a Research Statistician, Center for Family Research, University of Georgia, 1095 College Station Rd., Athens GA 30605 (yifu@uga.edu). Ronald Simons is a Distinguished Research Professor, Department of Sociology, 116 Baldwin Hall, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (rsimons@uga.edu). Angela R. Black is a Postdoctoral Fellow, Illinois Public Health Research Fellow, Community Health Sciences, School of Public Health, 1603 W. Taylor St., 625 SPHPI, Chicago, IL 60612-4394 (arblackl@uic.edu). Carolyn E. Cutrona is the Director, Institute for Social and Behavioral Research, and Professor of Psychology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (ccutrona@iastate.edu). Frederick X. Gibbons is a Professor of Psychology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (fgibbons@iastate.edu).

Abstract

Abstract: This investigation of the effects of stressful life events on rural African American women’s relationship well-being, psychological functioning, and parenting included 361 married or long-term cohabiting women. Associations among stressful events, socioeconomic status, perceived racial discrimination, coping strategies, psychological functioning, relationship well-being, and parenting were tested. Stressful events were related directly to diminished relationship well-being and heightened psychological distress and indirectly to compromised parenting. The results can inform research and intervention with African American women.

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