Get access

Wives’ Relative Income Production and Household Male Dominance: Examining Violence Among Asian American Enduring Couples*

Authors


  • *

    The preparation of this article was supported by a postdoctoral fellowship grant from the Family Research Consortium IV, which is funded by grant 5T32 MH019734 from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). The National Latino and Asian American Study is supported by the NIMH (U01 MH62209 and U01 MH62207), with additional support from the Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research at the National Institute of Health and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

**Grace H. Chung is a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Culture and Health, University of California, 760 Westwood Plaza, Box 62, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (ghchung@ucla.edu).

M. Belinda Tucker is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences, Center for Culture and Health, Semel Institute of Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California, 760 Westwood Plaza, Box 62, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1759 (mbtucker@ucla.edu).

David Takeuchi is a professor in the Department of Social Work, University of Washington at Seattle, 4101 15th Avenue NE 354900, Seattle, WA 98105-6299 (dt5@u.washing.edu).

Abstract

Abstract: This study integrates relative resource theory and cultural perspectives on husband-to-wife authority to examine male-to-female physical violence reported by Asian American wives in the National Latino and Asian American Survey. Findings indicated that the association between marital violence and male household dominance is complicated by women’s income relative to husbands’. We speculate that when husbands face threats on multiple levels to culturally determined masculine spheres of dominance, they are more likely to aggress against the perceived source of their status decline—thereby reaffirming one mode of dominance (physical). Practical implications of the findings are discussed.

Ancillary