Get access

Acculturation and Latino Family Processes: How Cultural Involvement, Biculturalism, and Acculturation Gaps Influence Family Dynamics*

Authors


  • *

    The authors wish to thank the Latino families who participated in this study. We also wish to acknowledge Dr. Flavio Marsiglia and Monica Parsai, MSW, for coordinating data collection in Arizona, and Rachael Dudenhausen, MSW, Melissa Grabofski, MS, and all the research staff members who conducted interviews for the Latino Acculturation and Health Project. This study was supported by grants from the Center for Disease Control’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (R49/CCR42172-02) and from the Centers for Disease Control’s Office of the Director (1K01 CE000496-01).

**Paul R. Smokowski is an associate professor and director of Latino Acculturation and Health Project in the School of Social Work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB # 3550, 325 Pittsboro Street, Room 324L, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3550 (smokowsk@email.unc.edu).

Roderick Rose is a research associate and evaluation director of Latino Acculturation and Health Project in the School of Social Work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB # 3550, 325 Pittsboro Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3550 (rarose@email.unc.edu).

Martica L. Bacallao is an assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, P.O. Box 26170, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170 (marticabacallao@yahoo.com).

Abstract

Abstract: This study investigated how adolescent and parent acculturation (culture-of-origin and U.S. cultural involvement, biculturalism, acculturation conflicts, and parent-adolescent acculturation gaps) influenced family dynamics (family cohesion, adaptability, familism, and parent-adolescent conflict) in a sample of 402 Latino families from North Carolina and Arizona. Multiple regression and hierarchical linear models suggested that culture-of-origin involvement and biculturalism were cultural assets related to positive outcomes, whereas acculturation conflict was inversely related to positive family dynamics and positively related to parent-adolescent conflict. Parent-adolescent acculturation gaps were inversely associated with family cohesion, adaptability, and familism but were unrelated to parent-adolescent conflict. Limitations and implications for practice are discussed.

Ancillary