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Low-Income Rural Mothers’ Perceptions of Parent Confidence: The Role of Family Health Problems and Partner Status*

Authors


  • *

    This research was primarily supported by a USCA/CSREES/NRICGP grant (2001-35401-10215, 2002-35401-11591, and 2004-35401-14938) for a Multistate Longitudinal Research Project (NC-223: October 1, 1998, to September 30, 2003) with researchers from California, Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Oregon, and Wyoming.

**Lenna Ontai is an assistant specialist in Cooperative Extension in the Department of Human and Community Development at the University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (lontaigrz@ucdavis.edu).

Yoshie Sano is an assistant professor in the Department of Human Development at the Washington State University—Vancouver, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA 98686 (yoshie_sano@vancouver.wsu.edu).

Holly Hatton is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Human and Community Development at the University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (hnpong@ucdavis.edu).

Katherine J. Conger is an assistant professor of the Department of Human and Community Development at the University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (kjconger@ucdavis.edu).

Abstract

Abstract: Parenting confidence can be undermined by the presence of frequent or persistent health problems, particularly for people living in rural communities that have limited access to adequate health care. However, little is known about how minor health problems in the family impact parenting. The current study examined single and coresident mothers’ parent confidence in relation to family health problems and parental support in a sample of 303 low-income, rural mothers with young children from 14 states. Results show that the presence of family health problems was negatively associated with parent confidence. For coresident mothers, there was an indirect relationship through perceived parental support.

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