Get access

Assessing Family Outcomes: Psychometric Evaluation of the Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale

Authors

  • Lesa Hoffman,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Pennsylvania State University
      Department of Psychology, 238 Burnett Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 68588-0308 (lhoffmanz@unlnotes.unl.edu).
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Janet Marquis,

    1. University of Kansas*
    Search for more papers by this author
    • *

      Research Design and Analysis Unit, Schiefelbusch Institute for Lifespan Studies, 1052 Dole, University of Kansas, 1100 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66045-7534.

  • Denise Poston,

    1. University of Kansas**
    Search for more papers by this author
    • **

      Beach Center on Disability, 3136 Haworth Hall, University of Kansas, 1200 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66045-7534.

  • Jean Ann Summers,

    1. University of Kansas**
    Search for more papers by this author
    • **

      Beach Center on Disability, 3136 Haworth Hall, University of Kansas, 1200 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66045-7534.

  • Ann Turnbull

    1. University of Kansas**
    Search for more papers by this author
    • **

      Beach Center on Disability, 3136 Haworth Hall, University of Kansas, 1200 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66045-7534.


Department of Psychology, 238 Burnett Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 68588-0308 (lhoffmanz@unlnotes.unl.edu).

Abstract

There is currently a lack of reliable scales with which to assess the construct of family quality of life, particularly for families who have children with disabilities. The current work presents 2 studies, including a total of 488 families with children with disabilities, which were conducted to complete the development of a scale to assess family quality of life. The measure was refined through confirmatory factor analyses into 25 items that assess 5 domains of Family Quality of Life: Family Interaction, Parenting, Emotional Well-Being, Physical/Material Well-Being, and Disability-Related Support. Each subscale was found to be unidimensional and internally consistent. An initial examination of test-retest reliability and convergent validity is also presented. Implications for future research, scale use, and policy are discussed.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary