Hispanic Voters in the 2000 and 2004 Presidential General Elections

Authors


  • AUTHORS’ NOTE: We would like to thank Kathleen Hall Jamieson for providing the resources for this study. We would also like to thank Adam Clymer for providing insights on this topic and Henry C. Kenski for giving comments on an earlier draft of this article.

Kate Kenski teaches political communication at the University of Arizona and was a member of the 2000 and 2004 National Annenberg Election Survey teams at the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania.

Russell Tisinger is a doctoral candidate at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania and was a member of the 2004 National Annenberg Election Survey team at the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania.

Abstract

In 2004, the vote margin between the major party presidential candidates was slim but wider than in 2000, leading scholars, pundits, and politicians to ask: among which demographic groups did George W. Bush specifically and the Republican party more generally make gains? Using data from the 2000 and 2004 National Annenberg Election Surveys (NAES), we examine the extent to which Bush and the Republicans made gains among an increasingly important group and growing segment of the U.S. population, Hispanic Americans. Results from the NAES demonstrate that Bush made inroads with Hispanics in 2004. While Bush improved his support among Hispanics, Hispanic party identification in 2004 was comparable to identification in 2000.

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