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Health education programs may be as effective as exercise intervention on improving health-related quality of life among Japanese people over 65 years

Authors

  • Kotaro Tamari,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Science and Social Welfare, Kibi International University, Okayama, Japan
      Dr Kotaro Tamari, Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Science and Social Welfare, Kibi International University. Email: ktamari@kiui.ac.jp
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  • Kenji Kawamura,

    1. Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Science and Social Welfare, Kibi International University, Okayama, Japan
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  • Mitsuya Sato,

    1. Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Science and Social Welfare, Kibi International University, Okayama, Japan
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  • Kazuhiro Harada

    1. Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Science and Social Welfare, Kibi International University, Okayama, Japan
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Dr Kotaro Tamari, Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Science and Social Welfare, Kibi International University. Email: ktamari@kiui.ac.jp

Abstract

Aim:  The current study was aimed to examine the short-term effects of a 3-month health education program on health-related quality of life using the Short-Form 36.

Methods:  Twenty-five Japanese older people aged 65 and older in the health education program were compared with two historical control groups (n= 25 each) undertaking group and resistance exercise interventions and matched by age, sex and body mass index. A series of split-design two-way analyses of variance were conducted for data analysis.

Results:  Significant improvements were observed in general health and vitality subscales of the Short-Form 36 in the educational program group. Multivariate analyses, adjusted for several confounding factors, revealed that the effects of the three programs were comparable.

Conclusions:  The findings suggest that a structured 3-month educational program may be as effective as exercise interventions in improving general health and vitality in a community-dwelling Japanese older population.

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