Prevalence of bacteria in the nipple discharge of patients with duct ectasia

Authors

  • R. M. S. Rahal,

    1. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics,1Medical School, Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health,2Federal University of Goiás, Goiania, Brazil
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  • 1 R. Freitas Júnior,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics,1Medical School, Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health,2Federal University of Goiás, Goiania, Brazil
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  • 1 C. Reis,

    1. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics,1Medical School, Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health,2Federal University of Goiás, Goiania, Brazil
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  • 2 F. C. Pimenta,

    1. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics,1Medical School, Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health,2Federal University of Goiás, Goiania, Brazil
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  • 2 J. C. Almeida Netto,

    1. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics,1Medical School, Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health,2Federal University of Goiás, Goiania, Brazil
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  • and 2 R. R. Paulinelli 1

    1. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics,1Medical School, Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health,2Federal University of Goiás, Goiania, Brazil
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*Ruffo Freitas Júnior, Alameda das Rosas, 533, Setor Oeste, 74110-060, Goiânia/GO, Brazil
Tel./Fax: + 55 62 2247203
Email: ruffojr@terra.com.br

Summary

The aim of this study was to identify the aerobic and the anaerobic microorganisms which can be related to duct ectasia. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 comprised 100 patients with coloured nipple discharge (duct ectasia group), and Group 2 (the control group) was composed of 50 patients without nipple discharge. The culture media used were BHI-PRAS, blood agar, mannitol agar and MacConkey agar. There was a high frequency of bacterial growth in the two groups: 85% in Group 1 and 88% in Group 2. The most prevalent bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. There was a statistically significant higher rate of smokers in the duct ectasia group compared with the control group, 25 (25%) patients vs. 5 (10%), respectively (p = 0.03). These findings allow us to put forth the hypothesis that the genesis of duct ectasia may be a non-infectious inflammatory process.

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