Evaluation of autologous bone marrow-derived nucleated cells for healing of full-thickness skin wounds in rabbits

Authors


Dr Amarpal, PhD, Division of Surgery, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar 243122, Uttar Pradesh, India
E-mail:amarpal@ivri.up.nic.in

Abstract

The aim of the study was to evaluate the potential of autologous bone marrow-derived nucleated cells to enhance the rate of healing of full-thickness excisional skin wounds in rabbits. The study was conducted on 20 New Zealand white rabbits of either sex. Two, 2 × 2 cm full-thickness skin (thoracolumabar region) excisional wounds were created; one on each side of the dorsal midline in each animal. The wounds were randomly assigned to either injection of autologous bone marrow-derived nucleated cells into the wound margins (BI), or topical application of sterile saline solution (normal saline, NS), which served as control. The wound healing was assessed by evaluation of granulation tissue formation, wound contraction, epithelisation and histopathological and histochemical changes up to 28 days after creation of the wound. Granulation tissue appeared significantly faster in BI-treated wounds (3.22 ± 0.22 days) than in NS-treated wounds (4.56 ± 0.47 days). Better epithelisation was seen histologically in BI wounds than in NS-treated wounds. Wound contraction was significantly more in BI wounds when compared with NS wounds on 21 post-surgery. Histopathological examination of the healing tissue showed early disappearance of inflammatory reaction, significantly more neovascularisation, and more fibroplasias and early lay down and histological maturation of collagen in BI wounds than in control wounds. It was concluded that injection of autologous bone marrow-derived nucleated cells in the wound margins induced faster and better quality healing of excisional skin wounds in rabbits when compared with normal saline. The injection of autologous bone marrow-derived nucleated cells can be used to promote healing of large full-thickness skin wounds in rabbits.

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