Regional anaesthesia with sedation protocol to safely debride sacral pressure ulcers

Authors

  • Daniel K O'Neill,

    Corresponding author
    1. DK O’Neill, MD, Department of Anesthesiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA
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  • Bryan Robins,

    1. B Robins, BS, NYU-NIH Summer Program, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA
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  • Elizabeth A Ayello,

    1. EA Ayello, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, CWON, MAPWCA, FAAN, Faculty, Excelsior College School of Nursing, The John A. Hartford Institute of Geriatric Nursing, New York University College of Nursing, New York, NY, USA
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  • Germaine Cuff,

    1. G Cuff, BSN, MPH, CCRP, Department of Anesthesiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA
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  • Patrick Linton,

    1. P Linton, MD, Department of Anesthesiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA
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  • Harold Brem

    1. H Brem, MD, Division of Wound Healing and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY, USA
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DK O’Neill, MD, Department of Anesthesiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA E-mail:Daniel.ONeill@nyumc.org

Abstract

A treatment challenge for patients with sacral pressure ulcers is balancing the need for adequate surgical debridement with appropriate anaesthesia management. We are functioning under the hypothesis that regional anaesthesia has advantages over general anaesthesia. We describe our regional anaesthesia protocol for perioperative and postoperative management.

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