The first year of a formal emergency medicine training programme in Papua New Guinea

Authors

  • Chris Curry,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Papua New Guinea and the Port Moresby General Hospital, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea
       Dr Chris Curry, Department of Emergency Medicine, Fremantle Hospital, PO Box 480, Fremantle, Western Australia 6959, Australia. Email: chris.curry@health.wa.gov.au
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  • Carolyn Annerud,

    1. School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Papua New Guinea and the Port Moresby General Hospital, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea
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  • Simon Jensen,

    1. School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Papua New Guinea and the Port Moresby General Hospital, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea
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  • David Symmons,

    1. School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Papua New Guinea and the Port Moresby General Hospital, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea
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  • Marian Lee,

    1. School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Papua New Guinea and the Port Moresby General Hospital, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea
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  • Mathias Sapuri

    1. School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Papua New Guinea and the Port Moresby General Hospital, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea
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  • Chris Curry, BMedSc (Hons) FACEM, Visiting Professor; Carolyn Annerud, FACEP, Senior Lecturer; Simon Jensen, FACEM, Senior Lecturer; David Symmons FACEM, Senior Lecturer; Marian Lee, FACEM, Senior Lecturer; Mathias Sapuri, SMHS, UPNG, Executive Dean.

    Conflicts of interests: None

 Dr Chris Curry, Department of Emergency Medicine, Fremantle Hospital, PO Box 480, Fremantle, Western Australia 6959, Australia. Email: chris.curry@health.wa.gov.au

Abstract

Objective:  To describe a programme catalyzing the development of emergency medicine in Papua New Guinea (PNG).

Methods:  Five emergency physicians rotated through a new position of Senior Lecturer in Emergency Medicine in the University of PNG during 2003. The position was established as a consequence of emergency physician input supported by AusAID in 2002.

Results:  Fifth (final)-year medical students and medical officers in the Emergency Department at Port Moresby General Hospital undertook formal and bedside problem based learning. The first trainees for a Master of Medicine in Emergency Medicine programme were inducted and supported. Emergency department management was provided with specialist input. Research projects were initiated, dealing with snakebite, chloroquine toxicity and HIV/AIDS. The first year of an emergency nursing curriculum was supported.

Conclusions:  There is now considerable enthusiasm for the development of emergency medicine as the hospital generalists’ specialty. Emergency nursing training has also made a start. Limitations on resources will require flexibility to sustain the project. Further support by emergency physicians will be needed.

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