Discharge planning and patient satisfaction in an emergency short-stay unit

Authors

  • Glenn Arendts,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Emergency Medicine, St George Hospital, Gray St, Kogarah, New South Wales, Australia
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    • Glenn Arendts, MBBS, FACEM, Staff Specialist in Department of Emergency Medicine; John MacKenzie, MBChB, Dip, MSM, Registrar; John K Lee, B App Sc (Nursing), Grad Dip A&E, Nurse Unit Manager.

  • John MacKenzie,

    1. Department of Emergency Medicine, St George Hospital, Gray St, Kogarah, New South Wales, Australia
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  • John K Lee

    1. Department of Emergency Medicine, St George Hospital, Gray St, Kogarah, New South Wales, Australia
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Dr Glenn Arendts, Department of Emergency Medicine, St George Hospital, Gray St, Kogarah, NSW 2217, Australia. Email: arendtsg@sesahs.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

Objectives:  To determine the adequacy of discharge planning from an emergency short-stay unit (ESSU), and patient knowledge of and satisfaction with the ESSU.

Methods:  Prospective follow up of patients discharged from an ESSU using patient surveys and a computerized patient information system, with descriptive and comparative data analysis.

Results:  Eighty-five per cent of respondents stated that they received adequate discharge instruction, and 89% that they benefited from their ESSU admission. However, 29% of patients made unscheduled visits to another medical practitioner post discharge and 9% were readmitted to hospital for the same problem with which they were discharged from the ESSU. Patient satisfaction with all aspects of care in the ESSU was high.

Conclusions:  Most patients discharged from an ESSU are provided with adequate discharge instruction, but a sizeable proportion require subsequent medical care for the same problem after discharge. Patient satisfaction with all aspects of care in an ESSU is high.

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