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Effect of psychosocial factors on metabolic syndrome in male and female blue-collar workers

Authors

  • Won Ju HWANG,

    Corresponding author
    1. College of Nursing Science, East-West Nursing Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea
    • Won Ju Hwang, College of Nursing Science, East-West Nursing Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, Korea. Email: hwangwj@khu.ac.kr

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  • Chung Yul LEE

    1. College of Nursing, Nursing Policy Research Institute, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Conflict of interest: none.

Abstract

Aim:  The purposes of this study were to examine the relationship between psychosocial factors and metabolic syndrome among male and female blue-collar workers, and which factors influence their metabolic syndrome by sex.

Methods:  A cross-sectional study was completed of 154 men and 80 women working at small companies in Korea. The data were collected through a structured questionnaire, blood test, and anthropometric and blood pressure measure. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed from the results of blood test and the measurements of waist circumference and blood pressure.

Results:  The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among male and female blue-collar workers was 24.0% and 7.5%, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to examine factors of metabolic syndrome associated with sex. After controlling for age, marital status, smoking, alcohol drinking, shift work, overtime work, and physical exercise, job stress (odds ratio [OR] = 3.10, P = 0.005) and risk perception (OR = 1.12, P = 0.016) were influencing factors for men, and low job stress (OR = 0.05, P = 0.04), low social support (OR = 1.51, P = 0.009), and risk perception (OR = 1.27, P = 0.023) for women.

Conclusion:  Metabolic syndrome among blue-collar workers is closely related to psychosocial factors, such as job stress, social support, and risk perception, with the effect of job stress a point of difference between men and women. Occupational health nurses should be cognizant of the importance of assessing the effect of psychosocial factors on cardiovascular risk for blue-collar workers.

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