Get access

Does mode of presentation affect performance on the Tower of London task?

Authors

  • Audrey MCKINLAY,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, and
    2. School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, VIC, Australia
      Audrey McKinlay, Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag, 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand.
      Email: audrey.mckinlay@canterbury.ac.nz
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Tracey MCLELLAN

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, and
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Funding: The current study was funded by the Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, New Zealand.

  • Conflict of interest: None.

Audrey McKinlay, Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag, 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand.
Email: audrey.mckinlay@canterbury.ac.nz

Abstract

Background:  The Tower of London (TOL) task is a well-used measure of planning. Performance on this task can be affected by a number of factors.

Methods:  We examined whether mode of presentation would influence performance by randomly assigning participants to complete a series of problems presented on an electronic version of the TOL or a manual version of the same task.

Results:  We found no significant differences between the two groups.

Conclusions:  Mode of presentation does not appear to affect performance on the TOL.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary