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Determinants of Patient Satisfaction Following Penile Prosthesis Surgery

Authors

  • Oluyemi Akin-Olugbade MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Urology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY;
      Oluyemi Akin-Olugbade, MD, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Department of Urology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, 525 East 68th Street, Starr 900, New York, NY 10021, USA. Tel: (212) 746-5653; Fax: (212) 746-0403; E-mail: yemiakin@yahoo.com
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  • Marilyn Parker RN,

    1. Department of Urology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, USA
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  • Patricia Guhring RN,

    1. Department of Urology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY;
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  • John Mulhall MD

    1. Department of Urology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY;
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Oluyemi Akin-Olugbade, MD, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Department of Urology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, 525 East 68th Street, Starr 900, New York, NY 10021, USA. Tel: (212) 746-5653; Fax: (212) 746-0403; E-mail: yemiakin@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Purpose.  Penile prosthetic surgery is associated with satisfaction rates >90% for the general penile implant population. It is suggested that satisfaction rates may be lower in certain populations. This study was undertaken to define potential predictors of satisfaction.

Methods.  Patients undergoing penile prosthesis surgery completed the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) prior to surgery, and the IIEF and Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS) questionnaires at least 6 months postoperatively accompanied by a Global Satisfaction Question (GSQ).

Results.  A total of 114 patients constituted the study population. Subgroups evaluated included patients with Peyronie’s disease (PD), body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m2, radical prostatectomy (RP), and patient age > 70 years. The mean patient age and duration of ED were 59 ± 14 and 3.2 ± 1.9 years, respectively. All groups demonstrated statistically significant differences between pre- and postoperative scores for the IIEF and EDITS. Patients with PD, a history of RP, and BMI > 30 kg/m2 had significantly lower scores on the GSQ, IIEF satisfaction domain, and EDITS compared with the general implant population. Only PD impacted negatively on the postoperative IIEF erectile function domain score. On the multivariate analysis, factors associated with ≥5-point difference in the IIEF satisfaction domain score compared with the general implant population were PD (RR = 4.2), RP (RR = 2.2), and BMI > 30 (RR = 1.8).

Conclusions.  These data suggest that men diagnosed with PD, BMI > 30, or previous RP undergoing penile prosthesis surgery have lower satisfaction rates than the general penile implant population. Akin-Olugbade O, Parker M, Guhring P, and Mulhall J. Determinants of patient satisfaction following penile prosthesis surgery. J Sex Med 2006;3:743–748.

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