SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Keywords:

  • Erectile Dysfunction;
  • Psychosocial Characteristics

ABSTRACT

Introduction.  Erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with psychological impairment, and further research is required to understand their relationship.

Aim.  We present descriptive baseline results from a longitudinal observational study of North American men seeking treatment for ED.

Methods.  Patients completed clinical and health-related quality-of-life information at baseline and three follow-up points over 12 months; 162 patients had usable baseline data, including clinical history and current status, sociodemographic information, and standard paper-and-pencil scales of psychosocial characteristics. Scores on the International Index of Erectile Functioning erectile functioning subscale were collapsed into mild (N = 27), moderate (N = 41), or severe (N = 94) categories. Using chi-square, anova, and logistic regression, we identified baseline characteristics associated with ED severity.

Main Outcome Measure.  The main outcome measure was the degree of psychosocial impairment associated with mild, moderate, and severe ED.

Results.  Severe ED was significantly associated with not having a regular sex partner; a history of prostate cancer; and worse scores on measures of positive affect, belonging/loneliness, sexual self-efficacy-strength, psychological adjustment, marital happiness, anxiety at last intercourse, and depression. In a multivariate logistic regression model, poorer sexual self-efficacy was most closely associated with severe ED. The model rescaled R2 was 0.63 (area-under-the-curve, 0.91).

Conclusions.  Severe ED is related to impairment across a broad range of psychosocial domains, and clinicians should consider offering patients assistance in dealing with its psychosocial impact. Latini DM, Penson DF, Wallace KL, Lubeck DP, and Lue TF. Clinical and psychosocial characteristics of men with erectile dysfunction: Baseline data from ExCEED™. J Sex Med 2006;3:1059–1067.