CASE REPORTS: Psychiatric Illness Presenting with a Sexual Complaint and Management by Psychotropic Medications: A Case Report

Authors

  • Michael Krychman MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Gynecology Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA,
      Michael Krychman, MD, Memorial Hospital—Gynecology, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA. Tel: +1-212-639-8045; Fax: +1-212-717-3214; E-mail: gynbreast@mskcc.org; monemvag@mskcc.org
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  • Jeanne Carter PhD,

    1. Gynecology Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA,
    2. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA
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  • Alison Amsterdam MD

    1. Gynecology Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA,
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Michael Krychman, MD, Memorial Hospital—Gynecology, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA. Tel: +1-212-639-8045; Fax: +1-212-717-3214; E-mail: gynbreast@mskcc.org; monemvag@mskcc.org

ABSTRACT

Introduction.  Sexual medicine healthcare professionals, who do not normally examine men and women with psychiatric disorders, need to be aware that those with psychiatric disorders can and do present with sexual medicine problems. In particular, psychiatric individuals may present with a variety of delusions including those that have sexual content or sexual implications. The rare disorder of reverse delusional misidentification syndrome may be encountered in schizophrenic patients and may be best managed by the combined team effort of a sexual medicine specialist and psychiatrist.

Aim.  To report a case study that reiterates the assessment and sexual medicine management of a female with sexual dysfunction who believed she was transforming into a male.

Methods.  Case report of a woman who attended an outpatient clinic in an academic medical center.

Results.  A 60-year-old woman with a history of paranoid schizophrenia presented to a gynecologist for ovarian cancer screening. Evaluation revealed complaints that the patient’s ovaries were testes that produced sperm and her clitoris was a penis capable of erection and ejaculation. Gynecological examination revealed only atrophic vaginitis. The patient was treated with local minimally absorbed vaginal estrogens and referred for psychological assessment and counseling. Psychotropic medication compliance was encouraged, weekly psychotherapy was continued, and delusional symptoms were minimized.

Conclusion.  Sexual medicine healthcare providers should be prepared to manage sex health concerns of men and women with psychiatric disorders, including delusional misidentification syndrome, in conjunction with a psychiatrist. Krychman M, and Amsterdam A. Psychiatric illness presenting with a sexual complaint and management by psychotropic medications: A case report. J Sex Med 2008;5:223–226.

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