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Is There a Role for Proteomics in Peyronie's Disease?

Authors

  • Trustin Domes MD,

    1. Department of Surgery, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada;
    2. Division of Urology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario, Canada;
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  • Ling De Young MD, MSc,

    1. Division of Urology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario, Canada;
    2. Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada;
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  • David B. O’Gorman MSc, PhD,

    1. Department of Surgery, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada;
    2. Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada;
    3. Division of Plastic Surgery, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario, Canada;
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  • Bing Siang Gan MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Surgery, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada;
    2. Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada;
    3. Division of Plastic Surgery, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario, Canada;
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  • Anthony J. Bella MD,

    1. Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA
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  • Gerald Brock MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Surgery, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada;
    2. Division of Urology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario, Canada;
    3. Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada;
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Gerald Brock, MD, Division of Urology, St. Joseph's Health Care, 268 Grosvenor Street, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 4V2. Tel: (+1) 519 646 6042; Fax: (+1) 519 646 6037; E-mail: gebrock@sympatico.ca

ABSTRACT

Introduction.  Peyronie's disease (PD) continues to be a major source of sexual dysfunction among the 3–9% of affected men. The challenge in treating PD is determining the natural history and clinical course for the individual patient. Currently, there exists no reliable means to predict whether a penile plaque of PD will progress, regress, or remain stable. This represents a significant deficiency in contemporary management, one that may be addressed with newer technologies such as proteomic profiling.

Aim.  This review assesses the potential use of protein alterations measured by various novel technologies, to predict progression, regression, or stabilization of PD in an affected individual.

Methods.  A comprehensive literature review of the past decade in the field of gene profiling and protein expression of PD was performed.

Main Outcome Measures.  A critical analysis of the existing worldwide literature evaluating surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS or SELDI) and other proteonomic techniques.

Results.  SELDI and other technologies can provide the clinician with innovative data indicating the presence of unique individual factors that act to suppress or promote the fibrotic process in PD. Determining the clinical implications of altered protein expression in an individual is not yet defined.

Conclusions.  The area of proteomics has begun to revolutionize the study of medicine in the postgenomic era, by allowing researchers to study the role that proteins play in health and disease. Applying this knowledge clinically has already led to innovative discoveries in early cancer detection in a number of malignancies, including prostate, ovarian, and bladder. Prior to the widespread use and acceptance of proteomic technology in PD, a critical assessment of its therapeutic and diagnostic value will be required. Domes T, De Young L, O'Gorman DB, Gan BS, Bella AJ, and Brock G. Is there a role for proteomics in Peyronie's disease?. J Sex Med 2007;4:867–877.

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