Continuing Medical Education: Vulvodynia (CME)

Authors

  • Andrew T. Goldstein MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center For Vulvovaginal Disorders, Washington, DC, USA;
    2. Johns Hopkins Medicine—Division of Gynecologic Specialties, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Washington, DC, USA;
      Andrew T. Goldstein, MD, Center for Vulvovaginal Disorders, 908 New Hampshire Ave. N.W. Suite 200, Washington, DC 20037, USA. Tel: 202-887-0568; Fax: 410-757-8741; E-mail: obstetrics@yahoo.com
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  • Lara Burrows MD, MSc

    1. Center For Vulvovaginal Disorders, Washington, DC, USA;
    2. The University of Connecticut School of Medicine and Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford, CT, USA
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Andrew T. Goldstein, MD, Center for Vulvovaginal Disorders, 908 New Hampshire Ave. N.W. Suite 200, Washington, DC 20037, USA. Tel: 202-887-0568; Fax: 410-757-8741; E-mail: obstetrics@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Introduction.  Vulvodynia is increasingly recognized as a cause of sexual pain.

Aim.  The goal of this Continuing Medical Education article was to provide a comprehensive review of vulvodynia including terminology, possible etiologies, and offer treatment options.

Methods.  A Medline search was conducted using several terms related to and including the terms vulvodynia, vulvar vestibulitis, vestibulodynia, and pudendal neuralgia.

Results.  A thorough review of vulvodynia.

Conclusion.  Vulvodynia most likely represents several disorders without an identifiable cause in many cases. The management of these patients requires a sensitive provider who can coordinate a multidisciplinary approach to their care. Despite the lack of large-scale, placebo-controlled trials, several new treatment options exist. Goldstein AT, and Burrows L. Vulvodynia. J Sex Med 2008;5:5–15.

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