Sexual Dysfunction—A Silent Hurt: Issues on Treatment Awareness

Authors

  • Olushola Abejide Adegunloye FWACP,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Behavioural Sciences, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria
      Olushola Adegunloye, FWACP, Department of Behavioural Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Kwara, Nigeria, 240001. Tel: +2348033701859; E-mail: solalami@yahoo.com
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  • Grace Gwabachi Ezeoke FWACS

    1. Department of Obsterics & Gynaecology, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria
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Olushola Adegunloye, FWACP, Department of Behavioural Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Kwara, Nigeria, 240001. Tel: +2348033701859; E-mail: solalami@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background.  The magnitude of sexual health problems and availability of treatment options in the local environment is yet to be documented; thus, there is an urgent need for this, as sexual dysfunction may be a real social and psychological problem, needing urgent attention.

Objective.  The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and pattern of sexual health seeking behavior, among secondary school teachers in Ilorin, Kwara State Nigeria.

Methods.  450 teachers were invited to complete an anonymous self-administered sociodemographic questionnaire, as well as three other instruments measuring human sexuality and general mental health status.

Main Outcome Measures.  The survey instrument used were the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5), a modified Sexual Activity Questionnaire (SAQ), and the General Health Questionnaire -30 (GHQ -30). Result were compared with established normative data, and validated cut-off scores that were available.

Results.  A total of 417 teachers (93%) responded to the questionnaire. The following prevalence rates were found: female anorgasmia (40%), lubrication failure (30%), dyspareunia (12%), erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and male orgasmic disorder (23% each), loss of sexual desire (24%), sexual life dissatisfaction, and relationship dissatisfaction six months prior to interview (10% each), and GHQ-30 scores were significant in sexual dysfunction in both genders, except for female anorgasmia and premature ejaculation in males. However, a presence of psychiatric morbidity was significantly found in overall sexual life dissatisfaction, as well as relationship dissatisfaction. The pattern of sexual health help-seeking behavior showed that majority (53%) do not seek treatment. Of these 53%, many (44%) gave the reason that they thought it transient, ignorance of hospital treatment service (30%), and fear of stigma (26%); also, among those that sought treatment, 46% chose alternative medicine.

Conclusion.  The prevalence of sexual dysfunctions found in this study is comparable to those reported in earlier Nigerian studies. Despite this and the significant “psychiatric morbidity” experienced in sexual difficulties, apparently no health services have been specially designed to address sexual dysfunction among the teacher's group or the general population at large. This study therefore draws urgent attention to the need for services geared towards alleviating sexual problems, more professional and patient education are recommended. Adegunloye OA, and Ezeoke GG. Sexual dysfunction—A silent hurt: Issues on treatment awareness. J Sex Med 2011;8:1322–1329.

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